The Way of the Water Priestess: Entering the World of Water Magic

A hands-on guide for witches, pagans, and others who are drawn to the magic of water for healing and protection.

The Way of the Water Priestess is a practical guide to the magical power of water and its resident spirits and how to use that magic for both self-empowerment and in the service of protector of water in all its forms. Written by the founder of Triskele Rose Witchcraft, the book offers a guide to revive the ways of the water priestess—to make water sacred again. This is not a new practice; women have tended the sacred waters since antiquity.
 
Readers of The Way of the Water Priestess will learn all the aspects of water magic:

  • Historical and archeological information about rites and rituals, and women's role in relationship to water
  • The lore of water goddesses from various cultures around the world
  • How to form an intimate connection with water in all its forms
  • Moon rituals, sacred bathing, and oracular and ritual arts
  • How to become a sacred vessel of water


From the Publisher

priestess; water; water witch; ocean; goddess; water goddess; healing; protection; water magic; seapriestess; water; water witch; ocean; goddess; water goddess; healing; protection; water magic; sea

priestess; water; water witch; ocean; goddess; water goddess; healing; protection; water magic; girl

priestess; water; water witch; ocean; goddess; water goddess; healing; protection; water magic; girl

priestess; water; water witch; ocean; goddess; water goddess; healing; protection; water magic; girl

priestess; water; water witch; ocean; goddess; water goddess; healing; protection; water magic; girl

priestess; water; water witch; ocean; goddess; water goddess; healing; protection; water magic; girl

priestess; water; water witch; ocean; goddess; water goddess; healing; protection; water magic; girl

The word “priestess” is a noun that describes a woman who performs the sacred rites of a particular religion. It is the feminine variant of “priest.” A priestess is thus a female officiant of sacred acts and a facilitator of ritual who serves a particular religion or deity(s), especially of a non-Christian religion. In history, priestesses were associated with the worship and temple tending of either male or female deities. But the roles embodied by the word “priestess” are vast, ever-evolving, and incapable of being limited by mere definitions. When you view the word “priestess” as describing an active participant in sacred activities, you acquire a broader understand of a priestess’ role. As an active participant in sacred rites, a priestess may be a ritual facilitator or guide, a healer or spell-caster, a prophetess or seer. A priestess defines herself by the role she chooses to fulfill and the way she exercises her powers.

The role of a water priestess is one dedicated to the service of the water and water spirits. This is not a new or isolated practice. In fact, it is quite ancient and is cross-cultural. Since antiquity, and possibly since the beginning of time, women have tended sacred waters. These sacred sources, were often found near temples or in groves, or perhaps were just local water sources. For hundreds of generations, these arts were passed on from culture to culture, eventually being forced almost completely underground by the advent of organized religions. Modern water priestesses are often drawn to serve a particular water goddess. Some are directly called by a particular body of water or spirit to be the human conduit for it. Priestesses who don’t work directly with water spirits or goddesses sometimes choose instead to work with a particular type of water, like the sea. Sometimes they call themselves sea priestesses. Others prefer to be called healers, or water magicians.

The work of a water priestess is expressed in various sacred practices like enchanting the waters, facilitating rituals, creating healing ceremonies, and preparing sacred baths. Water priestesses offer devotional practices to the water or water spirits, commune with water spirits, cleanse and purify the waters, and perform healing rituals with sacred water. As a water priestess, you may find yourself called to use water to heal your community, or you may be called to heal the water through energy work. You may be called to protect the water from more harm with magical or mundane water activism. You may feel led to join beach or river clean-ups, or to bless water for the land or your community. Your mission may be to revive the old temple arts in your community, or to find other ways to honor the water with singing, dancing, drumming, or chanting at the water’s edge.

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Exercise: Setting Up a Water Altar

Altars can be set up anywhere and can include simple or elaborate items and layouts. Items you can use on your altar include altar cloths, statues, candles, ritual tools, shells, and, for water priestesses, most likely a chalice or bowl. Most altars I have observed are more like working spaces and thus are often quite messy—but not dirty—whereas shrines are usually kept clean and lovely in devotion to the water spirit. Altars can take any form you like. The important thing is that you have a particular place to focus your work and your devotional practices. A clever water priestess may also want to create a water altar for other purposes as well—perhaps for protection or for another specific cause.

Blue, as the color most often associated with healing and water, should be the primary color for your water altar. To establish blue as the predominant color, choose a blue chalice, bowl, or other sacred vessel. When selecting healing items like crystals, herbs, symbols, or talismans to adorn your altar, choose blue when possible. Consider using the symbol of the Vesica Pisces found on the Chalice Well, as well as sacred healing waters stored in blue vials or jars, blue flowers and other offerings, and statues of the water goddesses you are petitioning for healing. It is up to you how your altar looks and what you put on it. Just make sure you leave space for your sacred vessel!

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